Research Feng Shui. Feng Shui Researcher.

Current research into feng shui

Feng shui research includes numerous scientific papers on feng shui (see some references below) and more than reference feng shui as well as related research from environmental psychology, neuroscience, cognitive ergonomics, social psychology, priming and so on. There is a new Academic Journal of Feng Shui, and several international conferences on Scientific Feng Shui and the Built Environment have examined feng shui from a scientific perspective.

Feng shui research

Feng shui research

Feng shui research includes:

1) Descriptions and definitions of feng shui
2) An understanding and explanation of how feng shui works
3) An evaluation of different feng shui schools, classical and modern and their methods
4) Applications of feng shui for homes, workplaces and public spaces
5) ‘Not only proof’ – alternative and interdisciplinary ways of looking at feng shui
6) Ways of disproving feng shui claims
7) Cross-referencing feng shui with other environmental sciences and disciplines

Types of potential feng shui research
There are many types of research methods and approaches, and depending on what is studied; an appropriate research method should be employed. For example, action research develops from the perspective that research should not be driven by an academic agenda with the aim of producing journal articles but needs directly benefit those whos lives, environmental circumstances and experiences are being studied.

Why and how do I research feng shui?

Over the past 45 years of my interest in natural sciences, dowsing, vastu and feng shui as well as environmental psychology I’ve collected a huge amount of research on these disciplines (more about me as a feng shui consultant). I’m naturally curious about how things and people work. I look for patterns of difference, what’s different and what’s the difference that makes the difference. My initial background was art, and design and I’ve trained myself at pattern recognition, systematic, synergistic, and rhizomatic thinking as well as scientific thinking with my environmental psychology studies. I also studied philosophy, which helped me to become a better and more discerning thinker as well as to understand how concepts are created. I am an avid reader and speed reader, which helps to process a huge amount of information (I also run speed reading courses in London).

The way I do research is always to check the source and the original papers. To find papers, I mostly use Google Scholar, Academia.edu, and Google Alert for specific research topics. I usually quickly read the executive summary and conclusions and check the methodology. Not all research has the same quality of scientific and statistical value. There is good and not so good research. In quantitative research, the first thing you learn with statistics is that if you “torture data long enough, it will give you the results you want”. This echoes the famous saying, that there are “lies, damn lies and statistics” which is probably the most repeated quote on the power of statistics, but it was Mark Twain who made a more accurate observation when he said, “facts are stubborn things, statistics are pliable”.

Research can help us become better feng shui consultants and improve the services we offer to clients

My professional priority is to spend 50% of my time in creative, new, intellectual, research work; 30% of my time in teaching and that includes writing and 20% of my time in the actual work with clients and companies. On average, depending on the time available, I spend a few solid months a year doing deep feng shui research, which includes attending conferences and webinars and writing which some of it you can read on my feng shui blog and Twitter @fengshuist. My humble, professional commitment is to have at least one thousand hours of creative, research work a year (the Feng Shui Society’s professional development requirement is only 30 CPD credits/year which is about 16 hours).

Research on feng shui matters

Involvement in research provides opportunities to be part of a professional community and to make a difference and contribution to the development of more efficient services for clients and the public. Involvement in feng shui research includes the willingness to use research findings as a prism to reflect on the experience of working with clients and companies. Although there are a few professional feng shui organisations and some try to do research, there isn’t one umbrella organisation that would provide a valuable research resource for feng shui professional community and the public.

One reason why there is so little research literature on feng shui is because feng shui approaches are fragmented or are not up to an acceptable, professional standard.

Many feng shui consultants develop an interest in research during their training but struggle to sustain the interest and engagement after that.  It can be very frustrating for modern feng shui consultants that the feng shui research literature that has been dominated by classical feng shui ideas and does not provide sufficient space for new, modern, emerging perspectives. Fortunately, modern environmental sciences and disciplines such as environmental psychology, cognitive ergonomics, priming, electromagnetics, geopathics and neuroscience provided insights into how people respond to different environmental stressors.

Evidence-based feng shui

I’ve been passionate about evidence-based feng shui since I’ve started studying this discipline. I always have been wondering why not use more evidence in feng shui. The use of randomised controlled trials, where you set up control groups and placebos to ensure the results of the research and experiments are reliable are standard in many disciplines, notably in medicine. There are no cast in stone laws of feng shui keeping us from designing and building a more evidence-based feng shui. And that’s what I’m doing. I’m working on my PhD in feng shui, which will be practical and relevant to modern working environments. The future of feng shui is evidence-based, and that’s where I’m putting my attention and focus, long-term. Also, I’m working on defining what chi/qi is, how it works, and what are intrinsic qualities of qi as well as measuring it.

 

Classical feng shui vs contemporary feng shui

Classical feng shui vs modern feng shui

Feng shui at the inflection point

An inflection point is a turning point or a major change in any discipline or business. Feng shui was born at a particular historical moment, in a particular place, a long time ago. Every discipline develops and changes which can be graphed on a timeline as cycles of growth and decline, which can predict its success. How things decline or collapse? Gradually and then suddenly – as most things in life. How can you predict when something is going to grow or decline? By looking at early warnings that things are about to shift?

One of the ways in which research on feng shui can inform this practice is to give the consultants insight into what life is like for people with particular type of envionmental issues.

One of them is research. When there are not enough people putting energy into research and into the next thing, sooner or later it will become obsolete in the same way as candles went out of business when the lightbulb was invented. Another aspect is that discipline hasn’t adapted to the demands and needs of modern life. In the case of feng shui, the public at the moment is more interested in remedying the immediate dangers of electromagnetic pollution than obscure ‘astrological/energetic’ calculations for the new year.

Research on priming

‘Priming’ refers to the passive, subtle, and unobtrusive activation of relevant mental representations by external, environmental stimuli. Priming research has shown that the mere, passive perception of environmental events directly triggers higher mental processes in the absence of any involvement by conscious, intentional processes. In feng shui, priming place a huge role as a direct/implicit and underlying psychological tool. All feng shui interventions have a priming effect as well as a placebo effect.

Dixon, N.F. Preconscious Processing. NY: Wiley, 1981.

Tulving, E. and D.L. Schacter. “Priming and Human Memory System.” Quoted by G.W. Farthing in The Psychology of Consciousness. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1992.

Barbur, J.L., et al. “Conscious Visual Perception Without V1.” Brain, 1993, Vol. 116; 1293-1302.
Lewicki, P., et al. “Nonconscious Acquisition of Information.” American Psychologist, June 1992, Vol. 47, No. 6; 796-801.

Over 200+ studies have shown such priming effects on impression formation as well as on social behaviour. An extraordinarily wide range of behaviours can be affected by subtle environmental stimuli, such as walking  speed, speech volume, academic performance, economic decisions.”  John Bargh, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science, Yale University

Watch John Bargh, who is the world leading expert on priming (or get his book Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do)

 

Research on electromagnetic pollution

There are over 6ooo papers on electromagnetic pollution and radiation – here’s a sample of them.

2,300 studies by the US Navy showing biological impacts of EMF: Naval Medical Research Institute 2300 Studies on EMF Health Effects

2016 NTP study preliminary results showing that cell phone radiation causes cancer in rats. This $25 million study is the gold standard of EMF research and makes it clear that our current wireless safety standards do not adequately protect the public.

2015 study showing 2.4 GHz WiFi decreases sperm function. Researchers conclude that “there should be a major concern regarding the exposure to Wi-Fi networks existing in the vicinity of our living places.”  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4503846/

German report on 878 Russian studies from 1960-1997 regarding the health effects of EMF. This report was buried by the German government as soon as it was published because of the consequences of its findings.

“Captured Agency” report on how the FCC is completely dominated by the wireless industry that it supposedly regulates. It is published June 2015 by investigative journalist Norm Alster and the Harvard University Center for Ethics. Mr. Alster also wrote about the Dot Com Crash and the 2008 Financial Crisis before they happened. Click for free PDF or Kindle versions.

Declassified 1976 Defense Intelligence Agency report showing that military personnel exposed to non-thermal microwave radiation experienced “headaches, fatigue, dizziness, irritability, sleeplessness, depression, anxiety, forgetfulness and lack of concentration.” Defense Intelligence Agency 1976 Report on Biological Effects of EMF

 

This presentation by Dr. Martin Pall in Norway November 2014 shows that our understanding of the health effects of weak EMF’s is about to completely change.

More on research on electromagnetic pollution

Research on feng shui

Mak, M. Y. (2004). Application of Feng Shui Knowledge to Preliminary Design Evaluation using Knowledge-Based Expert Systems Approach. PhD Thesis, University of Newcastle, Australia
He, Xiaoxin. (1998). Feng Shui: Chinese Tradition in a Manchester Context. PhD thesis. University of Manchester
Lee, S.-H. (1986). Feng Shui:  Its Context and Meaning. Doctoral dissertation, Cornell University. UMI
Scientific Feng Shui for the Built Environment – Fundamentals and Case Studies
Jill Poulston, Rene Bennett, (2012) “Fact, fiction, and feng shui: an exploratory study”, Facilities, Vol. 30 Issue: 1/2, pp.23-39, https://doi.org/10.1108/02632771211194257

Feng Shui: Its Impacts on the Asian Hospitality Industry J.S. Perry Hobson, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Measuring efficiency of the hotel and restaurant sector: the case of India Gunjan M. Sanjeev et al., International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Influence of Chinese geomancy on facilities operations and maintenance (FOM) Sui Pheng Low et al., Facilities

Kaup A.R., Harmell A.L., Yaffe K. (2019) Conscientiousness Is Associated with Lower Risk of Dementia among Black and White Older Adults (download pdf)

Bi Xia Chen, Yuei Nakama (2004) A summary of research history on Chinese Feng-shui and application of Feng-shui principles to environmental issues

Research on dopamine and prediction

Schultz W, Dayan P, Montague PR. A neural substrate of prediction and reward. Science 275:1593-1599 (1997).
Eshel N, Bukwich M, Rao V, Hemmelder V, Tian J, Uchida N. Arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors. Nature 525:243-246 (2015).
Omelchenko N, Sesack SR. Ultrastructural analysis of local collaterals of rat ventral tegmental area neurons: GABA phenotype and synapses onto dopamine and GABA cells. Synapse 63:895-906 (2009).
Cohen JY, Haesler S, Vong L, Lowell BB, Uchida N. Neuron-type-specific signals for reward and punishment in the ventral tegmental area. Nature. 482:85-88 (2012).
Richmond, L. L., & Zacks, J. M. (2017). Constructing experience: Event models from perception to action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 21(12), 962–980.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2017.08.005

Research on sleep

A. G. Wade, I. Ford, G. Crawford, et al., “Efficacy of prolonged release melatonin in insomnia patients aged 55–80 years: quality of sleep and next-day alertness outcomes,” Current Medical Research and Opinion 23, no. 10: (2007): 2597–605.
“Atlanta Snoring Institute. “Atlanta Snoring Institute Honors National Sleep Awareness Week by Providing Breakthrough Treatments and Cures.” http://www.prweb.com/releases/pillar-procedure/atlanta/prweb11643960.htm.
Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Mood and Sleep. http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/need-sleep/whats-in-it-for-you/mood.
Jean-Philippe Chaput Ph.D, Angelo Tremblay Ph.D. “Adequate sleep to improve the treatment of obesity.” CMAJ. http://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2012/09/17/cmaj.120876.
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency?” https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/printall-index.html.”
Roenneberg, T. et al. 2003, ‘Life between Clocks: Daily Temporal Patterns of Human Chronotypes’, Journal of Biological Rhythms, 18: pp. 80–90. 2.
Arendt, J. and Skene, D. 2005, ‘Melatonin as a chronobiotic’, Sleep Medicine Reviews, 9: pp. 25–39. Chang, A.M. et al. 2014, ‘Evening use of light-emitting e-readers negatively affects sleep, circadian timing, and next-morning alertness’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(4): pp. 1232–7.
“S. Cohen, R. Conduit, S. W. Lockley, S. M. Rajaratnam, and K. M. Cornish, “The relationship between sleep and behavior in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): a review,” Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders 6, no. 1 (2011): 44.”
Gooley, J. et al. 2001, ‘Melanospin in cells of origin of the retinohypothalamic tract’, Nature Neuroscience, 4(12): p. 1165.
“Cass, M.D., Hyla. “Let There Be Dark—and Melatonin.” Life Enhancement. http://www.life-enhancement.com/magazine/article/1677-let-there-be-dark-and-melatonin
Dvorsky, George. “Why we need to sleep in total darkness.” io9. http://io9.com/why-we-need-to-sleep-in-total-darkness-1497075228
Gooley, Joshua J., et al. “Exposure to Room Light before Bedtime Suppresses Melatonin Onset and Shortens Melatonin Duration in Humans.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3047226/?report=classic
Pikul, Corrie. “How To Turn Your Bedroom Into A Sleep Cave.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/02/how-to-sleep-better-bedroom-tips_n_3673088.html
Stevenson, Shawn. “Help Me Sleep! – 21 Ways To Cure Your Sleep Problems (Part 2).” The Shawn Stevenson Model. http://theshawnstevensonmodel.com/21-cure-sleep-problem-pt2/
West, Kathleen E., et al. “Blue light from light-emitting diodes elicits a dose-dependent suppression of melatonin in humans.” Journal of Applied Physiology. http://jap.physiology.org/content/110/3/619.abstract
V. Havlicek, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “EEG frequency spectrum characteristics of sleep states in infants of alcoholic mothers,” Neuropädiatrie 8, no. 4 (1977): 360–73. See also S. Loffe, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “Prolonged effects of maternal alcohol ingestion on the neonatal electroencephalogram,” Pediatrics 74, no. 3 (1984): 330–35.
Küller, R. et al. 2006, ‘The impact of light and colour on psychological mood: a cross-cultural study of indoor work environments’, Ergonomics, 49(14), pp. 1496–1507.
V. Havlicek, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “EEG frequency spectrum characteristics of sleep states in infants of alcoholic mothers,” Neuropädiatrie 8, no. 4 (1977): 360–73. See also S. Loffe, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “Prolonged effects of maternal alcohol ingestion on the neonatal electroencephalogram,” Pediatrics 74, no. 3 (1984): 330–35.
Bryn Mawr College. “Can Sex Cure Insomnia??? Serendip. http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro05/web2/contributor.html
Gloom. “Why Do Men Feel Sleepy After Sex?” Mental Health Daily. http://mentalhealthdaily.com/2013/04/24/why-do-men-feel-sleepy-after-sex-prolactin-oxytocin-vasopressin-et-al/
Jacques, Renee. “11 Reasons You Should Be Having More Orgasms.“ Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/05/orgasm-health-benefits_n_4143213.html
Keeners, M.D., Brigitte, Tillmann H.C. Kruger, M.D., Stuart Brody, Ph.D., Sandra Schmidlin, Eva Naegeli, and Marcel Egli, Ph.D. “The Quality of Sexual Experience in Women Correlates with Post-Orgasmic Prolactin Surges: Results from an Experimental Prototype Study.“ The Journal of Sexual Medicine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23421490
Wenner, Melinda. “Why Do Guys Get Sleepy After Sex?” Live Science. http://www.livescience.com/32445-why-do-guys-get-sleepy-after-sex.html”
V. Havlicek, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “EEG frequency spectrum characteristics of sleep states in infants of alcoholic mothers,” Neuropädiatrie 8, no. 4 (1977): 360–73. See also S. Loffe, R. Childiaeva, and V. Chernick, “Prolonged effects of maternal alcohol ingestion on the neonatal electroencephalogram,” Pediatrics 74, no. 3 (1984): 330–35.
“Brain Facts. “The Sleep-Wakefulness Cycle” http://www.brainfacts.org/sensing-thinking-behaving/sleep/articles/2012/the-sleep-wakefulness-cycle/
DiSalvo, David. ”To Get More Sleep, Get More Sunlight.” Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/06/18/to-get-more-sleep-get-more-sunlight/
Smart Tan. ”Sun Exposure Leads to Better Sleep: Study” https://smarttan.com/news/index.php/sun-exposure-leads-to-better-sleep-study/
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. “Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep.” http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brain_basics/understanding_sleep.htm”
Provencio, I. et al. 2000, ‘A Novel Human Opsin in the Inner Retina’, Journal of Neuroscience, 2000, 20(2): pp. 600–5.
Gradisar M., L. Lack, H. Wright, J. Harris, and A. Brooks. “Do chronic primary insomniacs have imparied heat loss when atempting to sleep?” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306160?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “Do Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep?”
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/12/19/Do-Cold-Temperatures-Improve-Sleep.aspx
Gradisar M., L. Lack, H. Wright, J. Harris, and A. Brooks. “Do chronic primary insomniacs have imparied heat loss when atempting to sleep?” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306160?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “Do Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep?”
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/12/19/Do-Cold-Temperatures-Improve-Sleep.aspx
O’Connor, Anahad. “The Claim: Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/health/04real.html?_r=0”
Appalachian State University. “Early morning exercise is best for reducing blood pressure and improving sleep.” http://www.news.appstate.edu/2011/06/13/early-morning-exercise/
Davis, Jeanie Lerche. “Morning Exercise May Help You Sleep.“ WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/menopause/news/20031104/morning-exercise-may-help-you-sleep
Experience Life. “Exercise Early, Sleep Better. http://experiencelife.com/newsflashes/exercise-early-sleep-deep/
Stevenson, Shawn. “Fatal Fat Loss Mistake#3 – Working Out At Night.” The Shawn Stevenson Model. http://theshawnstevensonmodel.com/fat-loss-mistake-working-out-at-night/
Widrich, Leo. “What Happens to Our Brains When We Exercise and how It Makes Us Happier.” Buffer. http://blog.bufferapp.com/why-exercising-makes-us-happier?utm_content=bufferd1a95&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=bufferWooten, M.D., Virgil D. “How to Fall Asleep.” How Stuff Works. http://health.howstuffworks.com/mental-health/sleep/basics/how-to-fall-asleep1.htm
O’Connor, Anahad. “The Claim: Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/health/04real.html?_r=0
Gradisar M., L. Lack, H. Wright, J. Harris, and A. Brooks. “Do chronic primary insomniacs have imparied heat loss when atempting to sleep?” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306160?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “Do Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep?”
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/12/19/Do-Cold-Temperatures-Improve-Sleep.aspx
O’Connor, Anahad. “The Claim: Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/health/04real.html?_r=0”
Heffernan, Margaret.’Too Little Sleep: The New Performance Killer’. Cbsnews.com. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/too-little-sleep-the-new-performance-killer/
Pomplun, Marc and Silva, Edward J. and Ronda, Joseph M. and Cain, Sean W. and Münch, Mirjam Y. and Czeisler, Charles A. and Duffy, Jeanne F. “The effects of circadian phase, time awake, and imposed sleep restriction on performing complex visual tasks: Evidence from comparative visual search.” Journal of Vision. http://www.journalofvision.org/content/12/7/14.full
Taffinder, NJ, McManus, IC, Gul, Y, Russell, RCG, Darzi, A. “Effect of sleep deprivation on surgeons’ dexterity on laparoscopy simulator.” The Lancet. http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140673698000348.pdf
Tracy, Abigail. “5 Tips to Get a Productive Night’s Sleep.” Inc. Magazine http://www.inc.com/abigail-tracy/five-tips-for-a-good-nights-sleep.html”
Duffy, J.F. et al. 2011, ‘Sex difference in the near-24-hour intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(3): pp. 15602–8.
Hall, C.S. and Nordby, V. J. 1972, ‘The individual and his dreams’, New York: New American Library.
Mathes, J.M. and Schredl, M. 2013, ‘Gender differences in dream content: Are they related to personality?’ International Journal of Dream Research, vol. 6(2): pp. 104–9.
“University of Maryland Medical Center. “Melatonin.” http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/melatonin
Wooten, M.D., Virgil D. “How to Fall Asleep.” http://health.howstuffworks.com/mental-health/sleep/basics/how-to-fall-asleep2.htm”
Becker, Joshua. “18 Good Reasons to Get the TV Out of Your Bedroom.” Becoming Minimalist. http://www.becomingminimalist.com/18-darn-good-reasons-to-get-the-tv-out-of-the-bedroom/
Gilbert, Jason. “Smartphone Addiction: Staggering Percentage Of Humans Couldn’t Go One Day Without Their Phone.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/16/smartphone-addiction-time-survey_n_1791790.html
Gittleman, Ann Lousie. “Hormones, Cell Phones and EMFs.” Are You Zapped. http://www.areyouzapped.com/articles/83
Lean, Geoffrey. “Mobile phone radioation wrecks your sleep.” The Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/mobile-phone-radiation-wrecks-your-sleep-771262.html
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “NEW Urgent Warning to All Cell Phone Users.” http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/06/16/emf-safety-tips.aspx
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “Cell Phones Raise Children’s Risk of Brain Cancer 500 Percent.” http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/10/11/cell-phones-raise-children-s-risk-of-brain-cancer-500-percent.aspx
Macrae, Fiona. “Computer in your child’s bedroom disturbs sleep and can lead to memory problems and poor marks in school.” Daily Mail. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2378417/Computer-childs-bedroom-disturbs-sleep-lead-memory-problems-poor-marks-school.html
National Cancer Institute. “Magnetic Field Exposure and Cancer: Questions[…]”
Nielsen, T. et al. 2004, ‘Immediate and delayed incorporations of events into dreams: Further replication and implications for dream function’, Journal of Sleep Research, 13: pp. 327–36.
Schredl, M. and Hofmann, F. 2003, ‘Continuity between waking activities and dream activities’, Consciousness and Cognition, 12: pp. 298–308.
Axelsson, J. et al. 2010, ‘Beauty sleep: experimental study on the perceived health and attractiveness of sleep deprived people’, British Medical Journal, 341: c6614.
Brandt, Michelle L. “Researchers ID best hours to sleep when time is limited People who rest in the early morning do better than those who sleep late at night.” Stanford Report. http://news.stanford.edu/news/2003/may28/sleep.html
Dean, Carolyn, M.D. “Magnesium – The Weight Loss Cure.” Natural News. http://www.naturalnews.com/036049_magnesium_weight_loss_cure.html
Gregoire, Carolyn. “Being Overweight, Obese Linked To Release Of Stress Hormone Cortisol After Eating.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/20/stress-weight-gain_n_3459755.html
Gunnars, Kris. “23 Studies on Low-Carb and Low-Fat Diets – Time to Retire The Fad.” Authority Nutrition http://authoritynutrition.com/23-studies-on-low-carb-and-low-fat-diets/
National Sleep Foundation. “Obesity and Sleep.” http://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/obesity-and-sleep/page/0%2C1/
MacGill, Markus. “Obesity link to lack of sleep suggested by brain scans.” Medical News Today. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264539.php
Pessoney, Stacy A. “Basic Magnesium Deficiency Causes Obesity and Diabetes.” Wholesale Nutrition. http://nutri.com/blog/2014/02/basic-magnesium-deficiency-causes-obesity-and-diabetes/
Shafii, Mohammad, Duncan R. Macmillan, Mary P. Key, Nancy Kaufman, and Irwin D. Nahinsky. “Case Study: Melatonin in Severe Obesity.” Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0890856709664467
Arnedt, J.T., Rohsenow, D.J., Almeida, A.B., Hunt, S.K., Gokhale, M, Gottlieb, D.J., and Howland, J. “Sleep following alcohol intoxication in healthy, young adults: effects of sex and family history of alcoholism.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21323679
Park, Alice. “Can’t Sleep? It May Be Affecting Your Memory.“ Time. http://healthland.time.com/2012/02/16/cant-sleep-it-may-be-affecting-your-memory/
Ross, Valerie. “Alcohol Side Effects: 4 Ways Drinking Messes With Your Sleep.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/17/alcohol-side-effects-drinking-sleep_n_3286434.html
Goins, Liesa. “How to Hold Your Liquor.” WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/balance/features/how-to-hold-your-liquor
Wikipedia. “Sleep and memory.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_and_memory
Rosenberg, Ph.D, Russell. “How Alcohol Can Ruin Your Sleep.” Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/russell-rosenberg-phd/alcohol-sleep_b_902578.html”
Dashti, H. et al. 2015, ‘Short Sleep Duration and Dietary Intake: Epidemiologic Evidence, Mechanisms, and Health Implications’, Advances in Nutrition, 6: pp. 648–59.
Eckel, R.H. et al. 2015, ‘Morning Circadian Misalignment during Short Sleep Duration Impacts Insulin Sensitivity’, Current Biology, 25(22): pp. 3004–3010.
Ishibashi, K. et al. 2007, ‘Inhibition of Heart Rate Variability during Sleep in Humans by 6700 K Pre-sleep Light Exposure’, Journal of Physiological Anthropology, 26(1): pp. 39–43.
Prather, A.A. et al. 2012, ‘Sleep and antibody response to hepatitis B vaccination’, Sleep; 35(8): pp. 1063–9.
St-Onge, M.-P. et al. 2016, ‘Fiber and saturated fat are associated with sleep arousals and slow wave’, Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 12(1): pp. 19–24.
Wang, Y. et al. 2015, ‘Relationship between Duration of Sleep and Hypertension in Adults: A Meta-Analysis’, Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 11(9): pp. 1047–56.
Wulff, K. et al. 2010, ‘Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in psychiatric and neurodegenerative disease’, Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 11(8): pp. 589–99.
Xie, L. et al. 2013, ‘Sleep drives metabolite clearance from the adult brain’, Science, 342(6156): pp. 373–7.
Gradisar M., L. Lack, H. Wright, J. Harris, and A. Brooks. “Do chronic primary insomniacs have imparied heat loss when atempting to sleep?” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306160?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
Mercola, M.D., Joseph. “Do Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep?”
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/12/19/Do-Cold-Temperatures-Improve-Sleep.aspx
O’Connor, Anahad. “The Claim: Cold Temperatures Improve Sleep.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/04/health/04real.html?_r=0”
Alhola, P. and Polo-Kantola, P. 2007, ‘Sleep deprivation: Impact on cognitive performance’, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 3(5), pp. 553–67.
Dawson D. and Reid K. 1997, ‘Fatigue, alcohol and performance impairment’, Nature, 388(235): p. 235.
Hafner, M. et al. 2016, ‘Why sleep matters — the economic costs of insufficient sleep: A cross-country comparative analysis’, Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation
Van Dongen, H. et al. 2003, ‘The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: Dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation’, Sleep, 2: pp. 117–26.
Palmer, C.A. and Alfano, C.A. 2017, ‘Sleep and emotion regulation: An organizing, integrative review’, Sleep Medicine Reviews, 31: pp. 6–16.
A. G. Wade, I. Ford, G. Crawford, et al., “Efficacy of prolonged release melatonin in insomnia patients aged 55–80 years: quality of sleep and next-day alertness outcomes,” Current Medical Research and Opinion 23, no. 10: (2007): 2597–605.
Simon, E.B. et al. 2015, ‘Losing neutrality: The neural basis of impaired emotional control without sleep’, Journal of Neuroscience, 35(38): pp. 13194–205.
A. G. Wade, I. Ford, G. Crawford, et al., “Efficacy of prolonged release melatonin in insomnia patients aged 55–80 years: quality of sleep and next-day alertness outcomes,” Current Medical Research and Opinion 23, no. 10: (2007): 2597–605.
Breene, Sophia. “The Best (and Worse) Positions for Sleeping.” Greatist. http://greatist.com/happiness/best-sleep-positions
BuzzFeed. “What Your Sleeping Position Says About You.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjoqsIgJTk0
Dale, Healther. “The Pros and Cons of Sleeping on Your Side, Back, and Stomach. PopSugar. http://www.fitsugar.com/Which-Sleep-Position-Healthiest-14571804
Hit Full. “22 Funny-Awkward Sleeping Positions.” http://www.hitfull.com/pictures/pset.php?set=funny_crazy_Awkward_Sleeping_positions
Pratiks. “3 Positions for 2 People Sleeping Together.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcV1CGN3tvA
Search Results: Sleep Position. YouTube.com https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sleep%20position&sm=3
UNP. Sleeping Style Chart. http://www.unp.me/f8/whts-your-sleeping-style-215474/
Wikipedia. “Snoring.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snoring
Vojta, Prof. Václav. “Who Developed Vojta Diagnostics and Therapy?” The Vojta Principle. http://vojtakonzept.de/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=47&Itemid=7&lang=en
Frew, David R. “Transcendental Meditation and Productivity.” Academy of Management Journal. http://amj.aom.org/content/17/2/362.short”
A. G. Wade, I. Ford, G. Crawford, et al., “Efficacy of prolonged release melatonin in insomnia patients aged 55–80 years: quality of sleep and next-day alertness outcomes,” Current Medical Research and Opinion 23, no. 10: (2007): 2597–605.
Sutherland, Stephani. “Bright Screens Could Delay Bedtime.” Scientific American. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bright-screens-could-delay-bedtime/f.lux software. Research. http://justgetflux.com/research.html”
Chevalier, G., S.T. Sinatra, J.L Oschman, and R.M. Delany. “Earthing (grounding) the human body reduces blood viscosity-a major factor in cardiovascular disease.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22757749
Ghaly, M.D., Maurice, and Dale Teplitx, M.A. “The Biologic Effects of Grounding the Human Body During Sleep as Measured by Cortisol Levels and Subjective Reporting of Sleep, Pain, and Stress .” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15650465
Kiefer, Dale. “Superoxide Dismutase Boosting the Body’s Primary Antioxidant Defense.” Life Etension Magazine. http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/jun2006_report_sod_01.htm
The Earthing Institute. “Are you grounded in water – the ocean, a lake, your swimming pool, your bathtub?” http://earthinginstitute.net/qa/%E2%97%8F-are-you-grounded-in-water-the-ocean-a-lake-your-swimming-pool-your-bathtub/
Lynn, Aaron. “Evening Rituals: Getting Better Sleep with a Little Preparation.” Asian Efficiency. http://www.asianefficiency.com/health/evening-rituals-getting-better-sleep-with-a-little-preparation/
Griffel, Mattan. “Unconscious Incompetence and the Four Stages of Learning.” Medium https://medium.com/self-investment/ad5583abf646
Tartakovsky, M.S., Margarita. “12 Ways to Shut Off Your Brain Before Bedtime.” Psych Central. http://psychcentral.com/lib/12-ways-to-shut-off-your-brain-before-bedtime/0006577”
Thomsen, D.K. et al. 2003, ‘Rumination: Relationship with negative mood and sleep quality’, Personality and Individual Differences, 34(7): pp. 1293–1301.
Vandekerckhove, M. et al. 2011, ‘The role of pre-sleep negative emotion in sleep physiology’, Psychophysiology, 48(12): pp. 1738–44.
“Sutherland, Stephani. “Bright Screens Could Delay Bedtime.” Scientific American. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bright-screens-could-delay-bedtime/f.lux software. Research. http://justgetflux.com/research.html”
Vandekerckhove, M. et al. 2012, ‘Experiential versus analytical emotion regulation and sleep: Breaking the link between negative events and sleep disturbance’, Emotion, 12(6): pp. 1415–21.
Clark, I. and Landolt, H.P. 2017, ‘Coffee, caffeine, and sleep: A systematic review of epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials’, Sleep Medicine Reviews, 31: pp. 70–8.
Garvey, J. et al., ‘Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea’, Journal of Thoracic Disease, 7(5); pp. 920–29. Hayashi, M. and Hori, A.M. 2003, ‘The alerting effects of caffeine, bright light and face washing after a short daytime nap’, Clinical Neurophysiology, 114(12): pp. 2268–78.
Khan, Z. and Trotti, L.M. 2015, ‘Central disorders of hypersomnolence: Focus on the Narcolepsies and Idiopathic Hypersomnia’, Chest, 148(1): pp. 262–73.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. “Meditation May Be An Effective Treatment For Insomnia.” ScienceDaily. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090609072719.htm
Better Sleep Through Meditation” 4 Techniques to Try Tonight.” Health Magazine. http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20189101,00.html
Finerminds. “Meet Your Brain Waves — Introducing Alpha, Beta, Theta, Delta, and Gamma.” http://www.finerminds.com/mind-power/brain-waves/
Meditations Mind Matters. “Brainwaves.” http://www.meditations-uk.com/information/brain_waves.html
Trafton, Anne. “The benefits of meditation.” MIT News. http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/meditation-0505.html”
04/11/women-bras-study-france-false-necessity_n_3062114.html
Ghana News. “Why Sleeping Without Clothes Is Good.” http://www.spyghana.com/why-sleeping-without-clothes-is-good/
Sisson, Mark. “How Light Affects Our Sleep.” Mark’s Daily Apple. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-light-affects-our-sleep/#axzz2wQlML18c”
Ong, J. et al. 2012, ‘Improving Sleep with Mindfulness and Acceptance: A Metacognitive Model of Insomnia’, Behaviour Research Therapy, 50(11): pp. 651–60. Riemann, D. et al. 2015, ‘The neurobiology, investigation, and treatment of chronic insomnia’, The Lancet Neurology, 14(5): pp. 547–58.
Slama H, et al. 2015, ‘Afternoon nap and bright light exposure improve cognitive flexibility post lunch’, Public Library of Science One, 10(5): 30125359.
Spielman, A. et al. 1987, ‘A behavioral perspective on insomnia treatment’, Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 10(4): pp. 541–53.
Zhu, L. and Zee, P.C. 2012, ‘Circadian rhythm sleep disorders’, Neurologic Clinics, 30(4): pp. 1167–91.
A. G. Wade, I. Ford, G. Crawford, et al., “Efficacy of prolonged release melatonin in insomnia patients aged 55–80 years: quality of sleep and next-day alertness outcomes,” Current Medical Research and Opinion 23, no. 10: (2007): 2597–605.
Asprey, Dave. “Sleep Hacking Part 3” Falling Asleep Fast with Biochemistry.” Bulletproof: The State of High Performance. http://www.bulletproofexec.com/sleep-hacking-part-3-falling-asleep-fast-with-biochemistry/
Ehrlich, N.M.D., Steven D. “5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP).” University Of Maryland Medical Reference Guide. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/5hydroxytryptophan-5htp
Ehrlich, N.M.D., Steven D. “Kava kava.” University Of Maryland Medical Reference Guide http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/kava-kava
Ehrlich, N.M.D., Steven D. “Valerian.” University Of Maryland Medical Reference Guide https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/valerian
Smucker, M.P.H., Ph.D, Celeste M. “Chamomile helps with anxiety, sleeplessness and depression.” Natural News. http://www.naturalnews.com/034454_chamomile_anxiety_depression.html
Sisson, Mark. “Why Melatonin Is a Dangerous Supplement.” Mark’s Daily Apple. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/before-you-close-your-eyes-make-sure-theyre-open/#axzz2vD0hbsog
Srivastava, Janmejai K. , Eswar Shankar, and Sanjay Gupta. “Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with a bright future (Review).” Molecular Medicine Reports. http://www.spandidos-publications.com/mmr/3/6/895

Research on food and perceptions around food and eating

The impact of tablecloth on consumers’ food perception in real-life eating situation, JingvLiu, Estelle Petit, Anne-Cecile Brit, Agnes Giboreau
Highlights: The influence of table linen on food perception was investigated in a real-life eating situation. Fabric table linen contributed to a significant higher preference of the appetiser and the meal quality in general. A better service, ambiance and overall experience at the restaurant were attributed to the fabric table linen. Three quarters of the participants considered the table linen as an important element when eating at the restaurant. This study confirmed that a small change of eating environment would influence the consumers’ perception of food.

The impact of lighting and table linen as ambient factors on meal intake and taste perception Author links open overlay panel by A.Bschaden, A.F.Dörsam, K.Cvetko, T.Kalamala, N.Stroebele-Benschop
Highlights: The influence of lighting on soup intake and taste perception was examined. Study 1 showed no differences in intake and taste in dim vs. bright light. Participants in study 2 ate more and rated the soup as better in dim light with a tablecloth. Ambient environmental factors can influence food intake and taste perception.

How the Brain Responds to Architecture

 

 

Research Feng Shui. Feng Shui Researcher.
4.8 58 vote[s]
Posted in Research on feng shui.